NSF-funded study finds cryptography students using Codio learn more than with traditional materials

By Elise Deitrick on Aug 20, 2019 2:33:36 PM

Since 2017, Codio has been working with a Cybersecurity-focused National Science Foundation (NSF) project to “engage faculty […] and other computer science educators […] to develop and pilot the planned cybersecurity-themed CSP course, train community college faculty to teach the new course, and disseminate it nationally.”

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Shorter, Open Texts Increase Learning

By Elise Deitrick on May 14, 2019 2:26:54 PM

The barriers of traditional textbooks

Students had very limited access to information when textbooks first became an educational tool—so they needed to include anything deemed relevant to a given subject. With access to more information than most libraries in their pockets, it no longer makes sense for students to lug around heavy, expensive physical textbooks.

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Python Tutor comes to Codio as “Visualizer”

By Elise Deitrick on Feb 27, 2019 8:40:52 PM

Visualizations can help students better understand complex programming concepts like parameters, constructors, and recursion.

For many computer science educators, Python Tutor is a familiar name —Philip Guo’s wonderful resource has been around for almost a decade. During that time, “over five million people in over 180 countries have used Python Tutor to visualize over 75 million pieces of code.”

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Introducing Codio Books!

By Elise Deitrick on Feb 25, 2019 4:25:47 PM

Why C-Books?

Codio recently released its first C-Book—“Think Python” by Allen Downey (see more details here). However, the sheer volume of textbook replacements and eBooks makes it hard to understand what makes C-Books different.

We Use Quality OER Books

First, we start by choosing quality OER (Open Educational Resource) books.

“Numerous studies of the impact of OER on student outcomes—conducted across diverse disciplinary, institutional, and jurisdictional contexts—have repeatedly confirmed the same result: that students using OER perform just as well as or, in some cases, better than those using commercial course materials."[1]

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